Adding Fem Dophilus to Yogurt

by Mary
(UK)

Q. I have ordered some Fem-Dophilus. My problem is the dextrose in it. I am very sensitive to it. Previously, by making yogurt with other strains of bacteria I have been able to reduce the lactose and turn it into lactic acid (in goats milk). I am hoping to do this with Fem-Dophilus. Can I combine it with a starter culture of L.Acidophilus, S.Thermophilus and L.Bulgaricus? If not, what can I combine it with?



A. I'm afraid I can't give you a really clear answer on this.

Yes, you can empty the powder out of Fem Dophilus and add it to yogurt made with Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus.

This has been done in two scientific studies.

In the first study, Yogurt containing probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and L. reuteri RC-14 helps resolve moderate diarrhea and increases CD4 count in HIV/AIDS patients, adding the two probiotics that are in Fem Dophilus to a yogurt made with Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus helped with diarrhea, flatulence and nausea in all of the patients within 2 days.

In the second study, Growth and survival of Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 in yogurt for use as a functional food, they showed that although it is possible to add both of the bacteria, the L reuteri RC-14 did not survive very well. The L rhamnosus GR1 survived well and was still viable 28 days after refrigeration.

I'm guessing that the acidophilus is unlikely to "fight" with the two probiotics from the Fem Dophilus although I have no proof of this. Many bacteria don't coexist with others of their kind.

So, for immediate use there should be no problem of adding Fem Dophilus to yogurt.

You can buy Fem Dophilus here.

For use after storage then only the L rhamnosus GR-1 is likely to still be present in large numbers.

L. rhamnosus GR-1 adheres to urogenital cells and stops the growth and adhesion of harmful bacteria. It is also resistant to the spermicide nonoxynol.

The two starter bacteria are excellent choices for converting lactose into lactic acid. They do this much better than all the fancy probiotics do!

However, your main problem is the dextrose that is added to Fem Dophilus. This is the sort of thing that no one studies and so there is no information out there. My guess is, I don't think the dextrose would be converted by the yogurt in the same way that lactose is. Now, I'm not a scientist so I stand to be corrected on this, but I note that dextrose is often added to yogurt (particularly frozen yogurts and soy) so I'm assuming it remains unchanged.

So if you're very sensitive to it, I think it would still be a problem.

There is another brand, Clinicians, with a product called Flora Restore but it also contains the dextrose.

I know some women add the contents of Fem Dophilus capsules to yogurt and use it vaginally. Suggestions on how to insert yogurt here. Depending on why you want to take Fem Dophilus, this might be a possible way round that problem.

It does sound as if a commercial yogurt will be produced with L rhamnosus GR1 in it in the foreseeable future. One is available in Tanzania already - but that's not much help to you or me right now!




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Jan 16, 2009
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L.reuteri
by: Mary UK

Thanks for your comments.

Regarding L.reuteri RC14 being OK for immediate use: Do you mean putting it into ready made yogurt for immediate consumption?

I need to know if it would be in my home made yogurt.

I would be adding it to the yogurt in the evening for the day after. So it would be in the yogurt for about 14 hours before I eat it.



Jan 16, 2009
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L reuteri
by: Dawn

Yes, the Lactobacillus reuteri RC 14 would be in your yogurt if you ate it the next day. There would be less of it than the L rhamnosus GR 1 but after one day there would be still be reasonable numbers.

In the study I mentioned, after 1 day there was 700,000 colony forming units of RC14 and 40,000,000 of GR1 in a milliliter of yogurt.

Jan 17, 2009
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L reuteri
by: Anonymous

Would the L reuteri increase or decrease in my yogurt? Would there be more or less after the yogurt has been made?


Jan 17, 2009
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L reuteri
by: Anonymous

If it is Lactobacillus reuteri RC14 (the strain found in Fem Dophilus) then it would be decreasing and fairly rapidly. I have no proof on what would happen with other strains of L reuteri but probably the results would be similar. This is if you add it yourself.

If it is in a commercial yogurt then it should be stable until the "best before" date.

If you're are adding a probiotic supplement of L reuteri to yogurt then eating it (or inserting it vaginally) using it sooner rather than later would be best.

Feb 10, 2010
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Fem-dophilus Product Video
by: Anonymous

Jarrow Formulas (http://www.jarrow.com) Unique probiotic for women's health. Fem-dophilus is backed by over 20 years of scientific research. Check out the product video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njriIPzx94w&feature=PlayList&p=46DDD2505A63E552&index=0&playnext=1

Mar 03, 2010
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L. reuteri as starter
by: Anonymous

I have L. Reuteri as a probiotic supplement; what would happen if I would use it as yogurt starter? would it be able to "make" yogurt alone, without addind other strands?

Mar 04, 2010
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L reuteri as starter
by: Dawn

By it self, L reuteri won't make milk into yogurt. For that you need to use the two standard starters, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, or a yogurt containing those two.

As well, L reuteri does not seem to survive well when added to yogurt.

If you're getting good results taking it as a supplement, then I would just continue doing that.

Mar 15, 2010
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dextrose
by: Anonymous

Most lactic acid bacteria, if not all ferment glucose (dextrose). Any in the starter should be fermented if given enough time. It's easier to ferment than lactose, which is a disaccharide made out of glucose and galactose. Some probiotic strains don't do well fermenting the galactose, but all are capable using glucose as far as I know.

Mar 18, 2010
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OK
by: Anonymous

dawn, anonimous, thank you for the answers.
I am not taking it as supplement; I was giving some to my kid when he was taking antibiotics. I don't believe in the value of taking these things long term. They do help to re-balance the flora in special situations when the flora is affected but I don't think mother nature intended them for long term ingestion.

As I had the reuterii available I was just thinking maybe I can use it to make yougurt. But in the meantime I realized that it is expired anyway...

Oct 10, 2010
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femdophillus as yogurt starter
by: Anonymous

Last night I emptied 3 fem dophillus capsules into 1 quart of milk that had been boiled in the microwave (10 minutes, no burning).

This morning, after about 10 hours of fermentation in the oven with no heat other than the oven light, I was graced with a yogurt like product.

There was significantly more whey than normal yogurt and it was significantly less acidic, but it was yogurt none the less.

I cannot vouch for the survival of both strains, but one of them clearly survived well enough to digest the milk.

I plan on using this as a way to extend the benefit from the pricey probiotic. The yogurt made from a probiotic can itself be used as a starter for another batch at a ratio of 1:5, though there is likely to be some drift in the probiotic content, i.e. one strain might dominate.

I plan on adding L. Acidophillus to get some tart back.

Hope this helps.


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